People + Strategy: The New Global Leaders

    Published on July 24, 2015

    When 31-year-old Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg decided he wanted a deeper understanding of China, he made concerted efforts to learn Mandarin and then demonstrated his acumen by speaking comfortably with Chinese students. In May, Alibaba founder Jack Ma promoted 42-year-old Daniel Zhang to CEO to “hand over leadership to those born in the ‘70s.” These are just to examples of the new global leaders. ... Read more

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    • CNBC: Learning From Starbucks On Job Creation

      Published on July 23, 2015

      Never accuse Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz of being afraid to take on tough issues. His latest effort is aimed at the issue of youth unemployment, which is stuck at 12 percent for people 16 to 24 years of age. This age category includes many young people who dropped out of school and have never been regularly employed. In many cases, they do not have the skills or training required for today's jobs, even with four million current jobs going unfilled. None of this fazed Schultz, as he organized Opportunity 100,000 to create 100,000 jobs for unemployed youth.

    • Huffington Post: The Phoniness of Donald Trump

      Published on July 21, 2015

      Donald Trump wants to become president. He's running a campaign based on vanity and ego, not authentic leadership, with some prejudice tossed in. You will have to look far and wide to find a public figure who is less authentic than Trump. Last Saturday he reached a new low when he attacked Senator John McCain's war record, saying, "He's not a war hero because he was captured." While McCain was held captive in the "Hanoi Hilton," Trump avoided the war through deferments.

    • Huffington Post: Donald Trump's Arrogance Is Outdated In Corporate America

      Published on July 20, 2015

      Insightful article from Emily Peck for Huffington Post in which I'm honored to be quoted, posted July 20, 2015 ... After spending decades as Wall Street darlings, arrogant business leaders are out of fashion. The new hotness for CEOs these days? Displaying humility, self-awareness and honesty. In this new world, a good leader doesn’t brag about his "TEN BILLION DOLLARS," as Donald Trump's campaign did last week. A good leader doesn’t rank his workers and fire the bottom 10 percent each year, as revered General Electric CEO Jack Welch did back in the day. The new CEOs project humility.

    • Huffington Post: The Triumph of Authentic Leaders

      Published on July 14, 2015

      In late 2006, Alan Mulally arrived as the new CEO of Ford with a plain shirt, slacks, and a big smile. That smile quickly faded, however, when he asked to meet workers in the main factory. "I'm sorry", a colleague told him, "but Ford executives don't talk directly to factory employees." Unflinching, Mulally insisted on going to the factory floor. Once there, he spoke to the workers about their dreams, their hopes for the company, and the values of Ford.

    • Huffington Post: True North Leaders: Antidote to the Leadership Crisis

      Published on July 8, 2015

      Today, I am launching this new weekly column, "True North Leaders," in conjunction with The Huffington Post. Each Monday, it will feature leadership insights and the stories of authentic leaders making important differences in the world. We will also take on current leadership challenges and analyze why leaders fail. Most important, the ideas in this column will help you discover your True North, so you can lead authentically throughout your life.

    • A Great Week for America

      Published on June 29, 2015

      This has been a very good week for America, a week in which the rights and dignity of all people have been upheld. In just a week, what progress we have made! Recall: The Supreme Court upheld the legal right of all people to marriage, overcoming centuries of discrimination against same sex couples.

    • Fast Company: The Key to Creating Socially Conscious Businesses

      Published on June 29, 2015

      On a broad scale, how do we create altruistic organizations that can really transform society and transform economic systems? This is the field I’ve been studying since I left the corporate world eight years ago, and I’m convinced that the key to this is compassionate, authentic leadership. We need a new generation of leaders to step forward and provide this new kind of leadership.

    • Part 6: Journeying Within

      Published on June 23, 2015

      As children and young adults, we spend a lot of time in self-reflection. Who am I? What is the point of life? How will I change the world? Although I’d like to say that with age comes wisdom, that isn’t always true. What is certain, however, is that aging brings responsibility. We spend so much effort rushing from work to home to activity that we don’t take the time to think about what it all means. Carl Jung once said, “Your vision will become clear only when you can look into your own heart. Who looks outside, dreams; who looks inside, awakes.” Use these questions to look inside yourself and light the path towards your True North.

    • Part 5: What Are Your Rocks?

      Published on June 18, 2015

      A professor filled a jar with rocks and asked his students if it was full. They agreed that it was. Then, he added pebbles and asked again if it was full. His students acknowledged that yes, the jar was still full. He poured in sand, which filled the spaces between the pebbles, and his students confirmed that the jar was full. The professor explained that the rocks represent your top priorities. The pebbles are the things in life that are less important, and the sand is the little, every day stuff. Then, he dumped out the jar and filled it with sand. Once the jar was full of sand, there was no room for the pebbles and the rocks.

    • CNBC: Target CEO hits the bull's-eye

      Published on June 18, 2015

      Target's CEO, Brian Cornell, is no stranger to difficult decisions. In 1981, Cornell stood in his UCLA dorm room, struggling with the biggest choice of his life. He could attend his college graduation, or he could fly to London to chase the girl who had "absolutely stolen his heart." Thirty-four years later, Cornell faced another difficult decision. While dining with CVS CEO Larry Merlo, he and Merlo hatched a plan to sell Target's pharmacies and its in-store clinics to CVS.

    • CNBC: Why Democrats should back Obama on TPP

      Published on June 16, 2015

      American unions rallied together for a show of power after years of losing members and political influence. They garnered enough Democratic votes to shoot down their own president, Barack Obama. Sunday's New York Times explained how this coalition came together. The feature pointed out that the unions threatened Democrats who voted for the bill with loss of funding and support. Money talks louder in politics than sound policy.

    • Part 4: Strengths and Weaknesses

      Published on June 4, 2015

      We each have certain assets and certain liabilities. You can maximize the use of your skills and talents and overcome your handicaps, but only if you’ve identified them. The fourth part in my series on Discovering Your True North helps you discover the positive qualities you may not even realize you possess, as well as any weaknesses that could be stumbling blocks to your success as a leader. Think about each question, and don’t just go for the easy answer. We all have a token response when someone asks us what our strengths and weaknesses are, but dig deeper!

    • Reuters: FIFA crisis worse than anything in Olympics scandal

      Published on June 10, 2015

      June 5 (Reuters) - Canadian lawyer Dick Pound, who headed the investigation to clean up the International Olympic Committee after the 2002 Salt Lake City winter games corruption scandal, said on Friday that the FIFA crisis was worse than anything the IOC faced.

    • Soccer’s FIFA Is Morally Bankrupt – Corporations Should Suspend Sponsorships Until Blatter Resigns

      Published on June 1, 2015

      The fish rots from the head, and this is undoubtedly the case with FIFA and its leader, Sepp Blatter. U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch’s indictment of 14 senior FIFA officials confirms what we all knew. FIFA is a deeply corrupt organization. Lynch, who collaborated with the police in Switzerland to arrest seven FIFA officials, detailed at least $150 million in corrupt payments over 24 years. At week’s end, Justice Department officials said they were preparing additional indictments.

    • Part 3: Shape Your Future

      Published on May 26, 2015

      We’ve looked at where you’ve come from and where you are now; it’s time to examine your future. Unlike your past and present, the future is vague and nebulous. Don’t let the unknown intimidate you. Each choice you make now will impact your path to your goals. Instead of worrying about what lies ahead, seize control of it. You are in charge of your own destiny, regardless of your circumstances. Don’t rely on luck to get you where you want to go; hard work trumps good luck every time. Answer these questions to narrow your focus and define your future.

    • Part 2: You Are Here

      Published on May 19, 2015

      A map is useless if you don’t know where you’re currently located. The questions in this blog, the second in a six-part series on “30 Questions to Discover Your True North,” are designed to help you determine where you are at this moment. Once you know where you stand, the path to your True North will be much clearer. Answer each question honestly and thoughtfully. Don’t get discouraged, and remember: where you are today is not where you’ll be tomorrow. The question is, are you moving forward or crawling back?

    • HBS Working Knowledge: Fixing the ‘I Hate Work’ Blues

      Published on June 6, 2014

      The New York Times ran a troubling story, "Why You Hate Work," in last week's "Sunday Review." The article indicated that employees work too hard and find little meaning from their work. The anecdotes we all hear about this topic are reinforced by the Gallup Poll, which shows that only 30 percent of employees are engaged in their work. The issues raised are ones I have worked on for many years. With the drive for higher productivity in the workplace, there is little doubt that people are putting in longer hours than they did two or three decades ago. In part, this drive comes from never-ending, short-term pressures of the stock market. An even greater factor is the global nature of competition today, which pits American organizations directly against counterparts in Asia, where work days are long and onerous.

    • Part 1: The Power of the Past

      Published on May 15, 2015

      Everyone makes mistakes, and we all fail at some point. It’s tempting to try to forget these failures, pushing them to the backs of our minds. But the mistakes we make lead us to better choices, and ultimately help us discover our True North. That’s why the past is the first thing I’m going to examine in this six-part series to help you determine what it is you’re looking for at this stage in your life - and the steps you need to take to get there.

    • CNBC: DuPont win over Peltz is a victory for long-term investors

      Published on May 14, 2015

      In the seminal proxy contest of the year, DuPont CEO Ellen Kullman and her board prevailed over an aggressive attack by activist investor Nelson Peltz and his Trian Fund, who nominated himself and three other directors. The reelection of all 12 members of the DuPont board is a significant victory for long term investors who supported Kullman's transformation of this 212 year old company, one of America's crown jewels of science and innovation.

    • The News Journal: DuPont CEO Ellen Kullman called a 'hero'

      Published on May 18, 2015

      To du Pont family member Tatiana Copeland, the DuPont Co.'s chief executive, Ellen Kullman, emerged Wednesday as "the hero of America." "She's the female John Wayne," Copeland said of Kullman after the company's annual meeting, where DuPont beat back activist investor Nelson Peltz and his Trian Fund Management in its bid to get four seats on the company's board. "She didn't flinch."

    • The DuPont Proxy Contest Is a Battle for the Soul of American Capitalism

      Published on May 11, 2015

      The subtitle in Saturday’s New York Times op ed by Joe Nocera jumped off the page, “Why shareholder value has become a disaster for the country.” Nocera was writing about the seminal proxy fight that will be settled on Wednesday, May 13, at DuPont’s annual meeting. On one side is the DuPont board of directors, one of the most distinguished of any U.S. corporation, which recommends the reelection of its 12 members. On the other is the activist investor Trian Fund that proposes a new slate of directors, led by Trian CEO Nelson Peltz, to replace four current DuPont directors.

    • New York Times: Even at the Top, Making Plans for Life’s ‘Third Chapter’

      Published on May 4, 2015

      When Sherry Lansing, the former chairwoman of Paramount Pictures, decided to end a 40-year career in the rough and tumble of Hollywood, the question she faced was where to direct all the energy and drive that had propelled her to the top of the industry. Lounging about in the suburbs of Los Angeles at age 60 was not going to be an option. So instead, she turned her attention to medical research, cancer research in particular, a subject that had taken hold of her years earlier when her mother died of ovarian cancer at age 64.

    • DealBook: Peltz’s Attacks on DuPont Threaten America’s Research Edge

      Published on April 9, 2015

      Since its founding in 1802, DuPont has been at the center of American scientific breakthroughs in chemistry. Among its research triumphs was the black powder that supplied 40 percent of the Allied needs in World War II. In 1912, DuPont founded the first industrial science labs in the United States. Since then, the company has produced a remarkable number of innovations that have had wide-ranging and long-lasting effects on society. These include DuPont’s patented chemicals like rayon in 1924, Teflon in 1938, Kevlar in 1965 and Solamet solar cells in 2007.

    • Harvard Life Hack: 5 Steps to Authentic Leadership with Bill George

      Published on April 6, 2015

      Bill George is the uncle you wish you had. With his quick smile, bright blue eyes, and perpetually-tanned skin, he is cooler than any professor should be. This week the Franklin Fellows had dinner with Bill. And, as we quickly realized, he’s much more than a pretty face. Within moments of meeting, he’d asked for each of our name, shook each member’s hand, and began inquiring about our life’s stories.

    • Speaking Out Against Discrimination

      Published on April 3, 2015

      Laws being passed this past week by Indiana and Arkansas to make discrimination legal on basis of religious freedom have stirred up a hornet’s nest of protests across the country, causing the Republican governors of these two states to ask that the legislation be modified. While LGBT obviously oppose these laws, many of the most criticism has come from CEOs of the nation’s leading companies. Last Sunday, Apple CEO Tim Cook led off the debate when he penned a powerful op-ed decrying Indiana’s religious freedom law. His decision to speak out was not without risk. Apple products exist in 76 countries where homosexuality is illegal.

    • 30 Questions to Help You Discover Your True North

      Published on April 3, 2015

      If you follow my blog, Twitter feed, or Facebook page, you’ll notice a constant theme: Discover Your True North. Both leaders and corporations have to develop a True North that follows their unique principles. If you try to ‘fake it until you make it,’ you won’t just be unsuccessful; you’ll also be miserable. How can you discover your True North so you can take steps to get where you want to go in life? You have to know what your values are and what’s important to you. To that end, I’ve come up with this list of 30 questions to help you find your True North. Don’t answer them all at once. Take a day to carefully think each one through. Remember, if you don’t know where you’re going, any road will take you there.

    • Inc: Why You Need Emotional Intelligence to Succeed

      Published on April 3, 2015

      While IQ has historically been thought of as the determining factor in the performance of leaders, new research from Dan Goleman and others demonstrates conclusively that for people with IQ above 120, EQ is the more important factor in predicting leadership effectiveness. This article shows that people with high EQ on average earn $29,000 more per year. The good news is that your EQ can be developed and improved, whereas IQ is relatively constant over your lifetime. By Discovering Your True North, you can begin to improve your EQ. Try it!

    • Jeff Sonnenfeld for WSJ: Activist Shareholders, Sluggish Performance

      Published on April 2, 2015

      Here’s an important article from my former colleague Jeff Sonnenfeld, who demonstrates that returns from activist funds are less than 50% of the S&P 500, and result in dismantling some formerly great companies. DuPont, in particular, does not deserve the kind of activist proxy attack Nelson Peltz is waging. It is a great company that is well run by CEO Ellen Kullman.

    • Zach Clayton: Building Business the Right Way

      Published on April 1, 2015

      From ZacharyClayton.com, posted March 31, 2015. Someone recently asked me if it was a disadvantage that Three Ships didn’t have venture capitalists. I laughed and thought about something Jim Goodnight, Founder of SAS, once told me. “I didn’t know what venture capital was when I started SAS,” he said and then paused dramatically. With a big grin, he then pronounced: “I’m sure glad I didn’t.”

    • World Economic Forum: How to find strength in admitting your weaknesses

      Published on March 27, 2015

      The willingness to admit your weaknesses and your vulnerabilities is actually very powerful. You can gain strength by admitting your faults to yourself and your peers. When you admit it, you make it a part of what we share as information about ourselves. It makes it okay for me to bring it up, which is crucial for working through conflict. You can even joke about it to ease tension. “You’re doing that thing again.”

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